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Genetic Linkage

What’s In A (Disease) Name?

Vincent Pieterse has some unusual traits, and a rare mutation. Are they related as a novel syndrome -- or not?
Marc Pieterse was angry.

His son Vincent’s unusual features – long, thick eyelashes; low-set ears; extra teeth; autistic behaviors; brittle hair; flat back of the head; hearing loss; developmental delay – had led Marc, an engineer and self-taught geneticist, to seek exome sequencing. He knew that strange combinations of traits could mean a mutation.

Sequencing Vincent’s exome – the protein-encoding part of the genome – could reveal if a new mutation had arisen in him, rather than having been inherited from his parents. And that’s what happened. Vincent has his own dominant mutation in a gene called RPS23. He isn’t, however, defined by any disease. He’s a striking, active, and happy young teen who loves watching and listening to birds as he rides his mountain bike to school through a nature reserve. Read More 
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Rare Disease Day 2017: Talia's Story

Talia Duff with Cynthia the Hippo
This year for Rare Disease Day – February 28th – DNA Science honors Cure CMT4J: Advancing Gene Therapy for Rare Diseases, run by Jocelyn and John Duff. Their daughter Talia’s “diagnostic odyssey” was unusually long because Down syndrome obscured a second condition, an extremely rare form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Read More 
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Disappearing Down Syndrome, Genetic Counseling, and Textbooks

Last week, several people sent me a perspective piece by bioethicist Art Caplan published in PLOS Biology, "Chloe’s Law: A Powerful Legislative Movement Challenging a Core Ethical Norm of Genetic Testing." The concise and compelling article considers legislation to mandate that genetic counselors talk to their patients more about positive aspects of having a child with trisomy 21 Down syndrome. Read More 
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Older Dads Have More Mutations

As a genetic counselor, I hate telling a woman over 35 that she’s of “advanced maternal age,” which raises the risk of conceiving a child who has an extra chromosome. Now older men are in the reproductive spotlight too.

Since the nineteenth century, physicians have noted that Down syndrome babies tend to be the  Read More 
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