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Genetic Linkage

Can Gene-Edited Stem Cells Treat Cystic Fibrosis?

Drugs that restore the shape of the errant protein behind cystic fibrosis (CF) have, over the past eight years, helped the majority of patients, who have certain mutations. Gene-corrected stem cells might offer a "mutation agnostic" option to CF.

 

CF results from a glitch in a glycoprotein with the unwieldy name "cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator", or CFTR. The proteins normally fold into channels that regulate the flow of ions into and out of cells, controlling the balance of water and salts in linings and barriers of the respiratory tract, pancreas, intestines, and elsewhere. If the proteins can't fold correctly, or can't migrate to the cell's surface and then open and stay that way, the resulting ion imbalance allows too much water into lining cells and secretions thicken. CF symptoms ensue, such as difficulty breathing and digesting. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has a helpful video (see below) both on why CF develops and the promise of gene-editing.

 

The most common CF mutation, F508del, removes just one of the protein's 1,480 amino acids (a phenylalanine), and that's enough to wreck the ion channels. Ninety percent of patients have at least one F508del variant. Researchers have identified more than 2,000 variants in the CFTR gene, about 350 of which are pathogenic.

  

To continue reading go to The Niche, where this post first appeared.

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