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Genetic Linkage

‘Designed to be slow’: Why these coronavirus vaccines in the pipeline won’t be ready this year

New York City has become a curious mosaic of crowds and barrenness, people packed into hospitals and homes, yet familiar favorite spaces eerily empty. The haunted cityscapes that accompany this article will fill again once we have a vaccine.

 

If all goes extremely well — with global cooperation, advances and insights to come, overlapping clinical trial phases, and a lot of luck — a year from now a vaccine or even vaccines against the novel coronavirus may exist. But that's a best-case scenario. Experts tend to be conservative.

 

"It's hard for me to see that we'd have a vaccine on this side of January. The process is designed to be slow, reflective, peer-reviewed and evidence-based. It takes a long time, not the science part nor to build the vaccine, but to conduct safety testing in enough people across enough time," said Gregory A. Poland, MD, director of the Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group and editor-in-chief of the journal Vaccine.

 

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