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Glenn Nichols, surrounded by his hospice team. The author is in yellow.

Genetic Linkage

Genetic Modifiers: Healthy Mutants Fuel Drug Discovery

April 12, 2013

Tags: BRCA1, BRCA2, incomplete penetrance, 23andMe, exome, genome, genetic counseling, amyloidosis, Alzheimer, Parkinson

Disease-causing mutations in healthy people suggest new drug targets. (NHGRI)
I’m uneasy counseling a patient for mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 cancer susceptibility genes. Typically, she’ll have a “first degree relative” – usually a mother or sister – with a related cancer, or might even have a test result in hand. This happened a week ago.

FUZZY GENETIC INFORMATION
My patient comes from a long line of female relatives who’d died young from breast or ovarian cancer. She’s already been tested and knows she has a BRCA1 mutation. Will she get the family’s cancer? Knowing would enable her to decide whether and when to undergo surgery to remove her breasts, ovaries, and uterus. (more…)

Why I Don't Want to Know My Genome Sequence

November 2, 2012

Tags: exome, genome, human genome project, Craig Venter, James Watson, Ozzy Osbourne, Francis Collins

Even after writing 10 editions of a human genetics textbook, I don't want to know my genome sequence. Yet.
Famous folk have been writing about their genome sequences for a few years now. But when I received two such reports at once last week – about genetics researcher Ron Crystal, MD, and a hypothetical (I think) story about President Obama, I knew it was time to take action.

Or, in my case, inaction. (more…)

Hidden Meanings in Our Genomes – And What To Do With Mendel

August 20, 2012

Tags: human genome, exome, linkage, mutation, American Journal of Human Genetics, Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications, DNA, Huntington disease, cystic fibrosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, ALS, essential tremor, Gregor Mendel, Ricki Lewis

Gregor Mendel: should he stay or should he go (in textbooks)? (National Library of Medicine)
Summer reading for most people means magazines, novels, and similar escapist fare, but for me, it’s the American Journal of Human Genetics (AJHG). Perusing the table of contents of the current issue tells me what’s dominating this post-genomic era: information beyond the obvious, like a subtext hidden within the sequences of A, (more…)

instruction
Project to engage students in helping families with rare genetic diseases
Book Club Reader's Guide
Many challenging questions to stimulate thought and discussion.
Instructor's Guide
38 discussion questions to get students thinking and talking about gene therapy, including the science, ethical issues, and the drug approval process.
Narrative science
The Forever Fix is the uplifting true story of 8-year-old Corey Haas, who was cured of hereditary blindness just 4 days after gene therapy.
College Textbooks
A spectacularly-illustrated, clearly written human anatomy and physiology textbook, used in pre-health profession programs throughout the U.S.
A highly engaging, clearly written, beautifully illustrated introduction to the science of human genetics for the non-scientist. Now in its 10th edition.
Nonfiction
An ideal starting point for anyone who wants to know more about genes, DNA, genomes, and the genetic ties that bind us all.

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